The academic shortcomings of Jesus denialists

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Re: The academic shortcomings of Jesus denialists

Postby Tempo Gain » Sat Feb 18, 2017 02:02

Tempo Gain wrote:
The implication of the letters that belief in Jesus took root in such a short time is interesting. I want to read up on this period and early Christianity in general.


Reading a pretty interesting book in this vein now, "Who Wrote the New Testament?: The Making of the Christian Myth" by Burton L Mack. Just starting really, and haven't thought about the inevitable counterarguments, criticism and recriminations, but enjoying it already. It seems well-researched. He gets right into a compelling analysis of the subject. If you've ever wondered about things like why Christian writings seem to be coming from different angles (the gospels of John and Mark say), you might like this, even if that last bit of the subtitle isn't quite your thing.
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Re: The academic shortcomings of Jesus denialists

Postby Bu Lai En » Tue Feb 21, 2017 15:08

Tempo Gain wrote:
Tempo Gain wrote:
The implication of the letters that belief in Jesus took root in such a short time is interesting. I want to read up on this period and early Christianity in general.


Reading a pretty interesting book in this vein now, "Who Wrote the New Testament?: The Making of the Christian Myth" by Burton L Mack. Just starting really, and haven't thought about the inevitable counterarguments, criticism and recriminations, but enjoying it already. It seems well-researched. He gets right into a compelling analysis of the subject. If you've ever wondered about things like why Christian writings seem to be coming from different angles (the gospels of John and Mark say), you might like this, even if that last bit of the subtitle isn't quite your thing.


I've been reading quite a bit on the subject recently too - mostly audio lectures actually - and find it fascinating. I've been listening to lectures by Bart Ehrman a lot. He's a bit repetitive and just spells things out in a bit too much detail, but as a lecturer in a Southern University his usual audience is often fundamentalist Christians who are really having their beliefs challenged.

One of Ehrman's books - Misquoting Jesus (about the New Testament) - is available from Taipei City Library Main Branch if anyone's interested. Edit: actually, the book is 'Jesus, interrupted : revealing the hidden contradictions in the Bible (and why we don't know about them)'
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Re: The academic shortcomings of Jesus denialists

Postby Tempo Gain » Tue Feb 21, 2017 16:04

Yeah, I've watched a number of his lectures and debates. He's very interesting and a good speaker. I know what you mean, I could probably recite his opening segment by heart :) I would like to get a copy of "Lost Christianities"--I think that is covering some of the same ground as the book I'm reading now.
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Re: The academic shortcomings of Jesus denialists

Postby Tempo Gain » Thu Nov 09, 2017 00:50

I came across a Yale university course on NT and related history. Interesting so far

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... 55C51E75E0
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