State attorney, you say?

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State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Thu Jul 13, 2017 19:48

Oops:



Love the back-pedalling. It was because your windows are really dark. :lol:
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Toad » Thu Jul 13, 2017 20:18

LOL!

Can't understand why the guy was so nervous though. For one thing, any idiot can pretend to be the State Attorney, or the State Executioner, or whatever. Also, I couldn't quite make out what he was babbling about, but it sounded as if he'd checked the license plate and found it to be invalid, or not in the database, or summit. Assuming he was telling the truth, I don't see anything untoward about routine checks of that kind; it is, after all, what license plates are for. Unless I misheard?
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Thu Jul 13, 2017 20:28

Toad wrote:LOL!

Can't understand why the guy was so nervous though. For one thing, any idiot can pretend to be the State Attorney, or the State Executioner, or whatever. Also, I couldn't quite make out what he was babbling about, but it sounded as if he'd checked the license plate and found it to be invalid, or not in the database, or summit. Assuming he was telling the truth, I don't see anything untoward about routine checks of that kind; it is, after all, what license plates are for. Unless I misheard?

I assumed it was on her ID (resident septics - is that right?). He certainly went into full melt-down very quickly. She's accepted that the stop was lawful, but may press for a more detailed explanation for the reasons behind it.

As far as I see it he either panicked because he'd got caught out profiling a black driver, or he panicked because he'd stopped someone important. Either way, doesn't look good.
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Thu Jul 13, 2017 20:36

Toad wrote: Also, I couldn't quite make out what he was babbling about, but it sounded as if he'd checked the license plate and found it to be invalid, or not in the database, or summit.


I've listened to it again, twice more, and it seems like he's suggesting the license number wasn't on the system. I wonder whether someone of her level has protection in this regard. You wouldn't want anyone to know details about yourself if you were high up in the legal department. In which case, as you say, there was no reason for him to get all nervous and blabber like a muppet.

EDIT: although she's got a point when she asks what was the tag run for. Random license plate checks - fuck off! :lol:
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Toad » Fri Jul 14, 2017 09:13

Big Vern wrote:I wonder whether someone of her level has protection in this regard. You wouldn't want anyone to know details about yourself if you were high up in the legal department.

That's a possibility. However, you'd think there'd be procedures in place for that - like the search result coming up as classified or something.

Big Vern wrote:In which case, as you say, there was no reason for him to get all nervous and blabber like a muppet.

I feel a bit sorry for the guy. I reckon he was all of 19 years old in his second week at work - the fact that he was sitting in a car checking license plates suggests he's low down in the pecking order.

Big Vern wrote:EDIT: although she's got a point when she asks what was the tag run for. Random license plate checks - fuck off! :lol:

I dunno. It's not unreasonable, or necessarily intrusive. I suppose it depends exactly what the search results are.

In the Philippines at least half the vehicles have no license plates, because the agency responsible just can't be bothered issuing them. And then they wonder why drive-by shootings are so common. So I don't really have a problem with "random license checks". A car is a lethal piece of equipment, and it's also easily stolen. Keeping tabs on who owns them (or purports to own them) isn't a bad thing.

Having said all that, the fact that he was blabbering suggests he checked because she was black and driving a fancy car ...
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Fri Jul 14, 2017 09:18

Toad wrote:
Having said all that, the fact that he was blabbering suggests he checked because she was black and driving a fancy car ...


He's not done himself any favours.

EDIT: He must already be in trouble as he wouldn't have put that video up voluntarily. "Hey guys, look at how I fucked up at work today LOLZ!".
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby sandman » Fri Jul 14, 2017 13:14

Toad wrote:LOL!

Can't understand why the guy was so nervous though. For one thing, any idiot can pretend to be the State Attorney, or the State Executioner, or whatever. Also, I couldn't quite make out what he was babbling about, but it sounded as if he'd checked the license plate and found it to be invalid, or not in the database, or summit. Assuming he was telling the truth, I don't see anything untoward about routine checks of that kind; it is, after all, what license plates are for. Unless I misheard?

That was my take, too. He mentions that her windows were blacked out, therefore he obviously was unaware what colour of skin she has. The driver did nothing untoward, nor did the cop. (Although, dunno about Murkland, but blacked-out windows are not allowed in UK. Automatic penalization?) The woman was polite. The cop was polite. What a total non-story.
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Fri Jul 14, 2017 13:43

sandman wrote:That was my take, too. He mentions that her windows were blacked out, therefore he obviously was unaware what colour of skin she has. The driver did nothing untoward, nor did the cop. (Although, dunno about Murkland, but blacked-out windows are not allowed in UK. Automatic penalization?) The woman was polite. The cop was polite. What a total non-story.


She appears to be making it a story. We don't know the reason why she was stopped and can't therefore assume that the officers were obviously unaware of the colour of her skin. Not all windows were tinted and she could have passed by the police car before they followed her. :idunno: She was driving a state-issued vehicle, which it appears have confidential license plates. As Toad suggests, it's odd that the police aren't made aware of this.

I thought the officer's reaction was amusing. Would have made Ali G's day. :lol:

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/07/12/us/fl ... index.html
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Toad » Fri Jul 14, 2017 15:02

Big Vern wrote:Would have made Ali G's day.

Yeah, in countries where policemen aren't potential psychopaths, with guns, a better artist than her would have had a few more laughs at that officers's expense :)

Thanks for linking the article though. Clarifies exactly what was going on there. Personally I think the guy should have been a bit more assertive since he was clearly doing nothing wrong.

While she said the stop appears to be lawful, she said that she intends to follow it up.

'follow up' in what way? Seems to me she's just pulling rank, which is precisely the sort of thing that does the 'black community' no favours. She appears to be suggesting that even if a policeman has a valid reason for pulling a car over, he shouldn't ask too many questions if he discovers that the driver is black.
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Fri Jul 14, 2017 15:19

I suppose there are a number of issues here, Toad.

1. Was she pulled over because she's black? Unlikely, but possible, and if so it is an issue. This seems to be the line she's pursuing.
2. Was she treated preferentially because of her position in society?
3. Did the officer treat her differently because he was fearful of being seen as racist?

Basically, he screwed up and it would have all been avoidable had he handled things differently.
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Toad » Fri Jul 14, 2017 15:28

Big Vern wrote:Basically, he screwed up and it would have all been avoidable had he handled things differently.

Yeah, I get the distinct impression he'd had inadequate training. Apparently someone had decided traffic duty was a nice easy job for him, and someone was wrong.

I remember being stopped (not me driving) for a routine breathalyser test in Australia and the guy was very professional; clearly going through a script, which was slightly embarrassing for all concerned (because you have to play along), but at least he'd had some training.

Similar occasion in the UK, back when rear-seatbelt laws were introduced, and the officer managed to be very solicitous while still telling me I was breaking the law. I was pretty grumpy at being pulled over because I thought it was "just a routine check, sir", which I'd had quite a few of at the time. In fact he'd noticed the kids weren't wearing seatbelts. It didn't occur to me to do the 'is it because I's black?' routine because he was doing his job, and doing it well (I didn't get ticketed, if you're wondering). Policemen are odd: Some are utter bastards who deserve a quiet kicking in a dark alley, and others are genuinely awesome people.

Anyway, point is, there's a right way and wrong way to handle a traffic stop, and someone had expected this poor guy to just figure it out all by himself.
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Sat Jul 15, 2017 11:47

Toad wrote: Policemen are odd: Some are utter bastards who deserve a quiet kicking in a dark alley, and others are genuinely awesome people.


I've heard from my American chums that US police officers are more likely to have an attitude. I don't know whether that's down to recruitment, training, or increased amount of stress on the job. The chaps back in bilayati inform me that the plod have become increasing belligerent in recent years, presumably because they are shown less respect.
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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Just Jennifer » Sat Jul 15, 2017 23:51

Attitude, huh? My son (okay, he's young) was a military cop for a couple of years and he's very polite and well-mannered. I don't think he was a cop long enough to develop an attitude. My cousin, a former Marine, was a narcotics cop (I don't know what they are called) and he too is a gentleman, but I am sure he was tough when he needed to be. I've seen how he disciplines his sons and mine :-)

Guess I never really thought too much about how many policemen we have in our family. Five I can recall. One definitely has an attitude. Just always been a jerk.


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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby Big Vern » Sun Jul 16, 2017 01:14

Just restating what I've heard, JJ. To be fair, people only ever have to deal with law enforcement when something bad has happened, so perhaps that influences their perception.

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Re: State attorney, you say?

Postby cfimages » Sun Jul 16, 2017 09:46

When you have something like a 1 in 2 or 1 in 3 chance that the person you're confronting has a gun, an attitude is understandable. That doesn't excuse anything that results from it but it might be a reason why a lot of American cops are more on edge than cops in Australia or the UK or Taiwan. It probably also differs from place to place. According to Google, Lewisboro, NY is the safest place in the US, with only 2 crimes reported in all of 2016 and neither of them violent. I'm sure the police there are a lot friendlier and more relaxed than the police in Orlando, which is in the top 20 or 25 most dangerous cities in the US.

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